Tayyeba K. Ali, MD

Tayyeba K. Ali, MD

Tayyeba K. Ali, MD, a Board Certified adjunct faculty member at California Pacific Medical Center, Department of Ophthalmology, specializes in complex corneal disease and uveitis. She sees patients at Palo Alto Medical Foundation / Sutter Health in Sunnyvale, CA. Dr. Ali also works as a medical specialist on contract for Google.

Prior to completing two fellowships in cornea, external disease, refractive surgery and uveitis at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, ranked #1 eye hospital in the United States by U.S. News & World Report, Dr. Ali finished her ophthalmology residency at the Jones Eye Institute / UAMS. She earned her medical degree from Emory University School of Medicine and completed her undergraduate training in English literature and creative writing from Agnes Scott College.

Dr. Ali has received many academic and teaching awards including the Bascom Palmer Fellow of the Year Award and the Jone’s Eye Dean’s Faculty Award. She has delivered dozens of lectures on the national and international level and published numerous meeting abstracts and peer-reviewed journal articles.

Tayyeba is keenly interested in international medicine, resident education, health technology and taking a closer look at the moral crossroads we face in healthcare. She is the Senior Fiction Editor for Stanford’s medical literary magazine, The Pegasus Review, and has a particular affinity for colons (grammatically, not anatomically, speaking) and semicolons. You can connect with her on instagram and twitter @drtkwrites or read excerpts from her writing online at www.tayyebaali.com.

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Resources
5 Procedures Every Ophthalmology Resident Must Know
Eyecare July 15th, 2022
5 Procedures Every Ophthalmology Resident Must Know

While there are many ophthalmic surgeries and treatments, here are five critical procedures that every resident should master.

The Sub400 Protocol and the Future of Corneal Cross-Linking
Eyecare March 14th, 2022
The Sub400 Protocol and the Future of Corneal Cross-Linking

The sub400 protocol is an exciting development for a patient population with high risk for vision-threatening complications. Delve deeper into this promising protocol.